Set 282019
 

L’iniziativa di Finriskalert.it “Il termometro dei mercati finanziari” vuole presentare un indicatore settimanale sul grado di turbolenza/tensione dei mercati finanziari, con particolare attenzione all’Italia.

Significato degli indicatori

  • Rendimento borsa italiana: rendimento settimanale dell’indice della borsa italiana FTSEMIB;
  • Volatilità implicita borsa italiana: volatilità implicita calcolata considerando le opzioni at-the-money sul FTSEMIB a 3 mesi;
  • Future borsa italiana: valore del future sul FTSEMIB;
  • CDS principali banche 10Ysub: CDS medio delle obbligazioni subordinate a 10 anni delle principali banche italiane (Unicredit, Intesa San Paolo, MPS, Banco BPM);
  • Tasso di interesse ITA 2Y: tasso di interesse costruito sulla curva dei BTP con scadenza a due anni;
  • Spread ITA 10Y/2Y : differenza del tasso di interesse dei BTP a 10 anni e a 2 anni;
  • Rendimento borsa europea: rendimento settimanale dell’indice delle borse europee Eurostoxx;
  • Volatilità implicita borsa europea: volatilità implicita calcolata sulle opzioni at-the-money sull’indice Eurostoxx a scadenza 3 mesi;
  • Rendimento borsa ITA/Europa: differenza tra il rendimento settimanale della borsa italiana e quello delle borse europee, calcolato sugli indici FTSEMIB e Eurostoxx;
  • Spread ITA/GER: differenza tra i tassi di interesse italiani e tedeschi a 10 anni;
  • Spread EU/GER: differenza media tra i tassi di interesse dei principali paesi europei (Francia, Belgio, Spagna, Italia, Olanda) e quelli tedeschi a 10 anni;
  • Euro/dollaro: tasso di cambio euro/dollaro;
  • Spread US/GER 10Y: spread tra i tassi di interesse degli Stati Uniti e quelli tedeschi con scadenza 10 anni;
  • Prezzo Oro: quotazione dell’oro (in USD)
  • Spread 10Y/2Y Euro Swap Curve: differenza del tasso della curva EURO ZONE IRS 3M a 10Y e 2Y;
  • Euribor 6M: tasso euribor a 6 mesi.

I colori sono assegnati in un’ottica VaR: se il valore riportato è superiore (inferiore) al quantile al 15%, il colore utilizzato è l’arancione. Se il valore riportato è superiore (inferiore) al quantile al 5% il colore utilizzato è il rosso. La banda (verso l’alto o verso il basso) viene selezionata, a seconda dell’indicatore, nella direzione dell’instabilità del mercato. I quantili vengono ricostruiti prendendo la serie storica di un anno di osservazioni: ad esempio, un valore in una casella rossa significa che appartiene al 5% dei valori meno positivi riscontrati nell’ultimo anno. Per le prime tre voci della sezione “Politica Monetaria”, le bande per definire il colore sono simmetriche (valori in positivo e in negativo). I dati riportati provengono dal database Thomson Reuters. Infine, la tendenza mostra la dinamica in atto e viene rappresentata dalle frecce: ↑,↓, ↔  indicano rispettivamente miglioramento, peggioramento, stabilità rispetto alla rilevazione precedente.

Disclaimer: Le informazioni contenute in questa pagina sono esclusivamente a scopo informativo e per uso personale. Le informazioni possono essere modificate da finriskalert.it in qualsiasi momento e senza preavviso. Finriskalert.it non può fornire alcuna garanzia in merito all’affidabilità, completezza, esattezza ed attualità dei dati riportati e, pertanto, non assume alcuna responsabilità per qualsiasi danno legato all’uso, proprio o improprio delle informazioni contenute in questa pagina. I contenuti presenti in questa pagina non devono in alcun modo essere intesi come consigli finanziari, economici, giuridici, fiscali o di altra natura e nessuna decisione d’investimento o qualsiasi altra decisione deve essere presa unicamente sulla base di questi dati.



Set 272019
 

IFRS 9: main innovations introduced

In 2005 the IASB & FASB jointly started a new accounting project in order to reduce the complexities related to the IAS 39 financial asset classification. This study aims at simplifying the financial instruments’ classification, hedge accounting rules and better monitoring financial market  evolutions as well as financial engineering developments.

IFRS 9 is composed by three main pillars:

  1. “Classification and measurement”, which replaces existing categories of financial assets and liabilities with new ones;
  2. “Impairment”, that proposes a new forward looking model, based on expected credit losses instead of already incurred ones;
  3. “Hedge accounting”, focused on hedging test simplification and on the extension of eligible hedging instruments’ perimeter.

A new loan market view

IAS 39 provided a single classification category for loans with credit exposures (“loans and receivables”) with an amortized cost measurement while the new financial instruments standard allows two possible measurements for financial assets (amortized cost and fair value – “FV” -, based on the entity’s business model and characteristics of the instrument), removing the IAS 39 loan portfolio constraint.

The IFRS 13 defines fair value as “the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date”.

Therefore, the introduction of IFRS 9 allows banks to assign a FV measurement to credit exposures implying a market driven method where the value is related to market conditions (buy/sell trades) and not to an amortizing schedule.

These changes regarding the measurement and the classification of credit portfolios are part of a deeper supervisory review on the treatment of loans within the regulatory framework:

  • Bank of Italy 2006/263 Circular excluded credit exposures from the regulatory trading book,
  • EU 2013/575 Regulation (“Capital Requirements Regulation”, CRR) firstly opened to this new classification by not strictly bind credit exposures from the perimeter of the trading book,
  • In 2017 the introduction of the ECB “Guidance on Leveraged Transactions” explicitly stated the opportunity to include loans in trading portfolios.  

Therefore, accounting and regulatory evolutions confirm a new market trend for loans, considered more as “hybrid market-credit instruments” than fixed assets to be maintained on balance sheet till maturity.

Implications for banks

Credit supply represents a fundamental part of the traditional banking activity, generating money to lend from public savings collection. Credit exposures have always been treated as fixed assets in banks’ balance sheets. The borrower’s financial stability and solvency were hence one of a bank’s major concern, which introduced monitoring systems in order to prevent missed repayments.

In the last few years, monetary policies focused on liquidity injections carried out by central banks have resulted in a strong reduction of the lending interest rates. This has been leading commercial banks to struggle to reach their profitability targets.

The current economic situation, as well as the described regulatory developments, has boosted financial institutions to look for new business opportunities to increase incomes and reduce costs even in loan management. Innovation has led to:

  • buy and sell loans in order to get capital gains introducing an high frequency loan trading activity (sustained by quick risk and issue valuations to catch market momentum),
  • dispose part of the loan portfolio reducing the regulatory capital consumption,
  • participate to ABS, CDO, CLO’s secondary market through the securitization process.

Besides this new credit portfolio management, there is also the possibility to get higher returns from advisory, arrangement and structuring activities by receiving upfront and ongoing fees.

A clear indicator of this continuous change is represented by the huge rise of the Over The Counter leveraged loan market, where loans, disbursed to high leveraged firms, are traded like bonds.

Following this new market driven view for credit instruments and the related market opportunities, banks face an important challenge: adapt their processes, functions and systems in order to produce analyses and valuations granting the correct “time to market”.

The internal processes must be radically reviewed in order to be agile since the client’s due diligence and information technology systems need to become dynamic enough to provide on demand data required for qualitative and quantitative assessments. Easily accessible databases and quick information flows are necessary also to allow Risk Management functions to assess risks over the time.

Risk management, in fact, assumes a fundamental importance due to the establishment of these new practices; risk-sensitive analyses on instruments must be adequately set up considering new extended risk frameworks, no longer exclusively represented by default risk but also by market dynamics. Loans are not considered fixed assets in balance sheets anymore but they are exchanged in the primary and secondary market as more “liquid” instruments.

Namely, some strict market risk metrics such as Value at Risk can be put in place also for loans in accordance to their new hybrid nature and intent.

This roll-out of metrics is not simple: new and dedicated methodologies have to be defined according to some specific credit characteristics of the instrument; in fact loans are typically tailor-made, not standardized and less liquid than other traded assets making it necessary to customize Value at Risk calculation in relation to the credit exposure.

Main methodological aspects to be considered are:

  • approach (in consideration of time-step and length of historical series),
  • confidence level,
  • time horizon (relating to instruments liquidity/market maturity to sustain daily calculation),
  • yield to be used (gross or net of funding and/or cost of capital)
  • spread curve to discount future cash flows (potential use of: single name curves, comparable single name curves, credit spread re-engineered from quoted obligations, use of CDS index or rating/sector comparable curves).  

Implications for regulators

While on one side the described dynamic context creates new banking business opportunities, on the other side regulators have to put increasing attention on banks’ loan management incoming practices.

In recent years, supervisory authorities have been concerned about the growth of high risk markets such as leveraged loan one. The financial system and real economy were until recently considered mature enough for a normalization of monetary policies but, nowadays, due to several geo-political issues, uncertainty is rising once again.

Because of continuous bank businesses evolutions, regulators have to carefully supervise any new activity put in place and its impact on the overall financial system. Financial sustainability has to be continuously monitored to avoid the dramatic consequences occurred in 2008. Even if after the financial crisis regulation constraints have increased, banking activity constantly evolves, forcing the supervisors to promote effective risk mitigation techniques at the right time.

Joint working groups of analysis between banks and regulators may set a positive framework in order to converge a sustainable business, share their different points of view and assess together adequately risks and opportunities.

Conclusion

European banks have only started approaching this business. A more dynamic balance sheet, an increasing focus on brokerage margin, a relevant reduction of regulatory capital requirements are just some of the benefits of these new practices. Business has the chance to turn the regulatory evolutions and market trends into new significant opportunities to increase the profitability and better manage its portfolio. Furthermore, this new loan management allows firms to access more easily to the credit supply and consequently to invest in their ideas and development.

Within this new loan market, earning opportunities are as relevant as their inherent risks, especially if related to high leveraged loans. Spreads of leveraged credit exposures allow institution to get high profits but also expose them to systemic risks considering intrinsic interrelation of these instruments among banks.

For this reason, a constant communication between Front Office functions and Risk Management should be the base to accurately and prudentially participate to these new business model activities.

Even though Risk Management structures are essential in defining and monitoring risk appetite frameworks and limits to this kind of exposure, it is as well really important that market participants will be able to self-regulate their actions avoiding to take excessively speculative positions. Given the market driven nature of these credit instruments, default risk may become a dangerous source of systemic risk to be burdened by a broader range of entities.

Regulators need to anticipate or, at least, strictly go hand in hand with the banking business developments in the eternal conflict between risk and return laying the foundations for a new and more comprehensive risk valuation which can cover at 360° almost all principal risks.

A strong and resilient historical memory should be the common base to inspire both banking and regulatory activities for the future.

Autori:

Paolo Gianturco – Business Operations & FinTech Leader

Silvia Manera – Business Operations Director

Tommaso Sacchi – Business Operations Senior Consulting

Nizar Mohamed Saeed Ahmed – Business Operations Analyst

Si ringrazia per il contributo Massimiliano Semprini – Leader of the Italian IFRS Centre of Excellence

Bibliography

Cimini Riccardo, Il sistema di bilancio degli enti finanziari e creditizi, Cedam Scienze Economiche e Aziendali, Wolters Kluwer Italia, 2016.

International Accounting Standard Board, “IFRS 9 – Financial Instruments”, 2014.

International Accounting Standard Board, “IAS 39 – Recognition and Measurement”, 2003.

International Accounting Standard Board, “IFRS 13 – Fair Value Measurement”, 2013.

Gazzetta Ufficiale dell’Unione Europea, “Regolamento (UE) n. 575/2013 del Parlamento Europeo e del Consiglio del 26 giugno 2013 relativo ai requisiti prudenziali per gli enti creditizi e le imprese di investimento”.

Banca d’Italia, Eurosistema, “Nuove disposizioni di vigilanza prudenziale per le banche”, Circolare n. 263 del 27 dicembre 2006.

European Central Bank, Banking Supervision, “Guidance on Leveraged Transactions”, 2017.

M. Longo, Il Sole 24 Ore, Quali sono i subprime 2.0? Occhi puntati sui leveraged loans made in Usa, 17 Febbraio 2019.

Set 212019
 

L’iniziativa di Finriskalert.it “Il termometro dei mercati finanziari” vuole presentare un indicatore settimanale sul grado di turbolenza/tensione dei mercati finanziari, con particolare attenzione all’Italia.

Significato degli indicatori

  • Rendimento borsa italiana: rendimento settimanale dell’indice della borsa italiana FTSEMIB;
  • Volatilità implicita borsa italiana: volatilità implicita calcolata considerando le opzioni at-the-money sul FTSEMIB a 3 mesi;
  • Future borsa italiana: valore del future sul FTSEMIB;
  • CDS principali banche 10Ysub: CDS medio delle obbligazioni subordinate a 10 anni delle principali banche italiane (Unicredit, Intesa San Paolo, MPS, Banco BPM);
  • Tasso di interesse ITA 2Y: tasso di interesse costruito sulla curva dei BTP con scadenza a due anni;
  • Spread ITA 10Y/2Y : differenza del tasso di interesse dei BTP a 10 anni e a 2 anni;
  • Rendimento borsa europea: rendimento settimanale dell’indice delle borse europee Eurostoxx;
  • Volatilità implicita borsa europea: volatilità implicita calcolata sulle opzioni at-the-money sull’indice Eurostoxx a scadenza 3 mesi;
  • Rendimento borsa ITA/Europa: differenza tra il rendimento settimanale della borsa italiana e quello delle borse europee, calcolato sugli indici FTSEMIB e Eurostoxx;
  • Spread ITA/GER: differenza tra i tassi di interesse italiani e tedeschi a 10 anni;
  • Spread EU/GER: differenza media tra i tassi di interesse dei principali paesi europei (Francia, Belgio, Spagna, Italia, Olanda) e quelli tedeschi a 10 anni;
  • Euro/dollaro: tasso di cambio euro/dollaro;
  • Spread US/GER 10Y: spread tra i tassi di interesse degli Stati Uniti e quelli tedeschi con scadenza 10 anni;
  • Prezzo Oro: quotazione dell’oro (in USD)
  • Spread 10Y/2Y Euro Swap Curve: differenza del tasso della curva EURO ZONE IRS 3M a 10Y e 2Y;
  • Euribor 6M: tasso euribor a 6 mesi.

I colori sono assegnati in un’ottica VaR: se il valore riportato è superiore (inferiore) al quantile al 15%, il colore utilizzato è l’arancione. Se il valore riportato è superiore (inferiore) al quantile al 5% il colore utilizzato è il rosso. La banda (verso l’alto o verso il basso) viene selezionata, a seconda dell’indicatore, nella direzione dell’instabilità del mercato. I quantili vengono ricostruiti prendendo la serie storica di un anno di osservazioni: ad esempio, un valore in una casella rossa significa che appartiene al 5% dei valori meno positivi riscontrati nell’ultimo anno. Per le prime tre voci della sezione “Politica Monetaria”, le bande per definire il colore sono simmetriche (valori in positivo e in negativo). I dati riportati provengono dal database Thomson Reuters. Infine, la tendenza mostra la dinamica in atto e viene rappresentata dalle frecce: ↑,↓, ↔  indicano rispettivamente miglioramento, peggioramento, stabilità rispetto alla rilevazione precedente.

Disclaimer: Le informazioni contenute in questa pagina sono esclusivamente a scopo informativo e per uso personale. Le informazioni possono essere modificate da finriskalert.it in qualsiasi momento e senza preavviso. Finriskalert.it non può fornire alcuna garanzia in merito all’affidabilità, completezza, esattezza ed attualità dei dati riportati e, pertanto, non assume alcuna responsabilità per qualsiasi danno legato all’uso, proprio o improprio delle informazioni contenute in questa pagina. I contenuti presenti in questa pagina non devono in alcun modo essere intesi come consigli finanziari, economici, giuridici, fiscali o di altra natura e nessuna decisione d’investimento o qualsiasi altra decisione deve essere presa unicamente sulla base di questi dati.

Set 202019
 

Benché le chiacchere su AI e Machine Learning superino di gran lunga la pratica (secondo Gartner[1], solo il 37% delle imprese utilizza l’AI, e ben il 40% delle start-up che si definiscono “di AI” non utilizza affatto l’AI[2]) , nel mondo delle banche e delle assicurazioni è opinione diffusa che grazie a tecnologie data-driven e innovazione digitale si possano offrire prodotti e servizi a costi molto più bassi.

Di questi guadagni d’efficienza ne beneficierebbe la profittabilità di un’industria proverbialmente poco dinamica (per rendersi conto di quanto, basta considerare l’imbarazzante e perdurante diffusione un linguaggio di programmazione paleozoico come il Cobol[3]). Un’industria che vive un periodo di grande compressione dei margini, e che di questi guadagni di produttività ne ha bisogno come il pane, viste le prospettive relative ai tassi d’interesse e ai margini d’intermediazione.

Ovviamente si avrebbero vantaggi anche per i consumatori, in termini di qualità di servizio e “financial inclusion”, nonché guadagni di produttività in altri settori dell’economia limitrofi.

Bello, sì.

Ma quanto è grande il guadagno di produttività legato a innovazione digitale e uso dei dati (i.e., Machine Learning, AI)? Cioè: con modelli operativi concretamente perseguibili in tempi accettabili, di quanto stiamo parlando?

Sulla base di alcune ipotesi che descrivo nel seguito e che trovano riscontro in software esistente, ho provato a fare una mano di conti. Mi sono focalizzato sul settore del wealth management inteso in senso lato: ossia servizi d’investimento, protezione di persone e cose (vale a dire servizi d’assicurazione), finanziamenti. L’odierna offerta di banche e gruppi assicurativi ad ampio spettro, insomma.

Immaginiamo una di queste realtà, con il classico modello di business basato su reti di professionisti – consulenti finanziari, private banker, o agenti assicurativi – e una tecnologia che:

  • individua precisamente bisogni ed obiettivi dei clienti dai dati, tramite Machine Learning (ottemperando tra le altre cose gli obblighi di legge, ossia profilazione e product targeting secondo MIFID e IDD);
  • aiuta a creare il miglior mix personalizzato di prodotti per ciascun cliente, e la conseguente Next Best Action;
  • offre automaticamente contenuti, modulistica e reportistica, anch’essi personalizzati in base alle preferenze e i bisogni dei clienti;
  • segue il life-cycle del cliente, a partire dalla fase d’ingaggio, imparando e adattandosi nel tempo.

Ora chiediamoci: cosa succede se forniamo all’azienda e alla sua rete questa tecnologia?

Per rispondere, con una piccola survey ho innanzitutto raccolto informazioni da alcuni consulenti finanziari sulla loro operatività e la saturazione del loro tempo, sulla quantità e qualità di clienti, su come si preparano ad incontrarli e altre informazioni di processo. Insomma: tempi e metodi. Ho considerato i dati sulla distribuzione della capacità patrimoniale tra i clienti, integrando diverse banche dati.

Essendoci varietà nelle risposte e poche certezze a questo mondo, ne è scaturito un modello probabilistico, calibrato sulle informazioni raccolte e sui dati a disposizione, che descrive il processo di gestione della clientela e le metriche ad esso associate. È un modello profondamente fondato su Agent-based modeling e Teoria delle Code[4], un campo della matematica applicata popolare nell’analisi di reti di telecomunicazioni, ma che si presta anche a rappresentare il servizio di consulenza finanziaria/assicurativa. Simulando il tutto con metodo Monte Carlo e sintetizzando l’informe nube di decine di migliaia di numeri sono emersi alcuni fatti interessanti, che riporto brevemente.

Risparmi di tempo e guadagni di produttività

Se si introduce questa tecnologia su una rete la cui capacità produttiva non è lontana dal punto di saturazione e il software in questione consente un risparmio di tempo significativo, del 35% in media (stima conservativa, basti pensare al tempo occorrente per assemblare una reportistica decente, o studiare il profilo del cliente), il guadagno di produttività, inteso come maggior numero di clienti gestibili è sorprendente: con probabilità superiore al 90%, la capacità di gestire clienti raddoppia. Esatto: radoppia. E qualche volta triplica.

Può stupire che una tecnologia che porta a un risparmio di circa un terzo del tempo porti a più che raddoppiare il numero di clienti gestibili. Ma, al di là del fatto che poche cose viaggiano in linea retta in natura e ancor meno in economia, ciò è tipico di sistemi che presentano inefficienze di processo e “colli di bottiglia”. Ora, il mondo finanziario-assicurativo è un condensato d’inefficienze di processo tanto quanto una stella di neutroni è un condensato di materia, sicché l’applicazione di Machine Learning e customer intelligence vanno a braccetto, portando a risultati sorprendenti.

Nuovi clienti, nuove masse in gestione e nuova raccolta premi

Nuovi clienti da servire equivalgono a nuove masse in gestione o a nuova raccolta premi. Ma, visto che i clienti obbediscono a una legge di Pareto (si veda il grafico seguente, una stima sulla popolazione reale), dove pochissimi hanno molto e molti hanno poco, probabilmente ciò significa andare a parare su clienti con minor potenziale. Infatti consulenti e agenti si concentrano tipicamente sul top 20% del bacino di clienti, sicché si tratterebbe di puntare sul restante 80%.

Concentriamoci per semplicità di calcolo sui prodotti d’investimento, e valutiamo l’incremento annuo di AuM associato ai nuovi clienti, riportato nel grafico seguente: nel 90% dei casi simulati l’incremento di AuM si colloca tra il 20% e il 46%, con una mediana del 33%. Identico incremento è atteso sulle commissioni, se si ipotizza che non cambino aumentando il numero di clienti.

Può andare anche meglio

Questo risultato appena descritto è condizionato dall’ipotesi che i clienti aggiuntivi siano tutti più piccoli degli attuali. Tutti. È un’ipotesi iperconservativa, visto che anche tra i “clienti mignon” si nasconde una quota di clienti ad alto potenziale[1]. Rilassando quest’ipotesi e ammettendo che alcuni nuovi clienti possano essere dimensionalmente importanti, l’incremento di AuM (e di riflesso quello delle commissioni) migliora sensibilmente e nel 95% dei casi – cioè praticamente sempre – è superiore al 40%, con mediana pari a 80%. Grosso modo lo stesso incremento è atteso sulle commissioni, essendo approssimativamente in relazione lineare con gli AuM.

I risultati sono nel complesso paragonabili a stime di tutt’altra natura, ottenute non per via simulativa – ad esempio McKinsey stima che gli advanced analytics portino ad un aumento di ricavi compreso tra il 15% e il 60%[2]. Ciò non toglie che quello qui presentato sia modello semplificato, un’approssimazione d’ordine zero della realtà. Comunque, questa prima, rude stima dell’impatto dell’innovazione digitale e della scienza dei dati nel wealth management dice forte e chiaro una cosa: l’impatto è rilevante, è qualcosa in grado di cambiare la redditività.

È evidente che ci sono altri benefici di drammatica importanza: pensate all’aumento della qualità del servizio al cliente – cosa che lo fidelizzerà e porterà ad una crescita del “life-time value”, con relativo impatto sul valore dell’azienda.

Al di là delle chiacchere e del grande “hype dell’AI”, questa tecnologia esiste. Anche se non basta solo la tecnologia, occorrono anche “soft skills”.

L’abilità infatti consiste nel trovare il giusto modello organizzativo per combinare:

  • tecnologia, raccolta efficiente dei dati e uso dei canali digitali – disponibili sempre, con processi paralleli simultanei e scalabili;
  • esperienza e professionalità del consulente finanziario o dell’agente assicurativo – disponibile solo in certi momenti, impossibile da utilizzare in modo parallelo e poco/niente scalabile, e che potrebbe temere l’innovazione tecnologica, rallentandola.

In altri termini, serve una data strategy[3] che apra la strada all’innovazione. Il beneficio è un portentoso salto in avanti in termini di qualità, produttività e quindi profittabilità per banche ed assicurazioni.


[1] Si veda https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/lo-strano-caso-dei-clienti-mignon-raffaele-zenti/

[2] “Advanced analytics in asset management: Beyond the buzz”, McKinsey & Company, https://www.mckinsey.com/industries/financial-services/our-insights/advanced-analytics-in-asset-management-beyond-the-buzz

[3] “Avete una data strategy?” FinRiskAlert, https://www.finriskalert.it/?p=7088


[1] “Gartner Survey Shows 37 Percent of Organizations Have Implemented AI in Some Form”, Gartner, https://www.gartner.com/en/newsroom/press-releases/2019-01-21-gartner-survey-shows-37-percent-of-organizations-have

[2] “Europe’s AI start-ups often do not use AI, study finds”, Financial Times, https://www.ft.com/content/21b19010-3e9f-11e9-b896-fe36ec32aece

[3] “Wanted at Banks: Young Tech Pros with Old-Tech Smarts”, American Banker, https://www.americanbanker.com/news/wanted-at-banks-young-tech-pros-with-old-tech-smarts

[4] Qui un’introduzione, per chi ne fosse a digiuno: http://wwwhome.math.utwente.nl/~scheinhardtwrw/queueingdictaat.pdf